The Midlife Feast

#51 - How to get diet culture out of your house with Jenn Messina RD

January 16, 2023 Jenn Salib Huber RD ND Season 3 Episode 14
#51 - How to get diet culture out of your house with Jenn Messina RD
The Midlife Feast
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The Midlife Feast
#51 - How to get diet culture out of your house with Jenn Messina RD
Jan 16, 2023 Season 3 Episode 14
Jenn Salib Huber RD ND

What did you think of this episode? Send me a text message and let me know!

When you know better, you do better. And if you're like many of the women in midlife I talk to, your desire to move away from diet culture may be in part motivated by your desire to change things for the next generation...I know mine was.

But getting diet culture out of the house means not only changing our behaviour, but also the language we use to describe food, bodies, and even health in general.

In this episode, dietitian Jenn Messina RD helps us understand why so many of us were programmed into diet culture from a young age, how to go back and repair when you say something you don't mean, and even how to talk to other family members when diet talk is the uninvited guest at the table.

To learn more about Jenn and her work, visit her website at www.jennmessina.com  and follow her on Instagram at @jennthedietitian.

Looking for a place to learn more about midlife, menopause nutrition, and intuitive eating? Click here to grab one of my free resources and learn what I've got "on the menu" including my 1:1 and group programs. https://www.menopausenutritionist.ca/links

Show Notes Transcript

What did you think of this episode? Send me a text message and let me know!

When you know better, you do better. And if you're like many of the women in midlife I talk to, your desire to move away from diet culture may be in part motivated by your desire to change things for the next generation...I know mine was.

But getting diet culture out of the house means not only changing our behaviour, but also the language we use to describe food, bodies, and even health in general.

In this episode, dietitian Jenn Messina RD helps us understand why so many of us were programmed into diet culture from a young age, how to go back and repair when you say something you don't mean, and even how to talk to other family members when diet talk is the uninvited guest at the table.

To learn more about Jenn and her work, visit her website at www.jennmessina.com  and follow her on Instagram at @jennthedietitian.

Looking for a place to learn more about midlife, menopause nutrition, and intuitive eating? Click here to grab one of my free resources and learn what I've got "on the menu" including my 1:1 and group programs. https://www.menopausenutritionist.ca/links

Jenn Huber  0:02  
Hi and welcome to the midlife feast the podcast for women who are hungry for more in this season of life. I'm your host, Dr. Jenn Celine Huber. Come to my table. Listen and learn from me. Trusted guests, experts in women's health and interviews with women just like you. Each episode brings to the table juicy conversations designed to help you feast on midlife. Hi, everyone, and welcome to this week's episode of the midlife feast. It is January we've just come through the holiday season, there was probably lots of gatherings with family and friends. And maybe your family was exposed to a little bit more talk about bodies and diets and diet culture than maybe you would have wanted. And maybe you are like many of the people that I've had conversations with already this year who have said, I really want to kick diet culture out of my house this year. I even had someone told me that that was their family resolution was to ditch diet culture as a family. So I'm really excited to welcome this week's guest. Jen Messina is also known as Jen, the dietician on Instagram, and she is a dietitian in BC. So fellow Canadian, and she works primarily with families, but she's very firmly rooted in the health and every size, intuitive eating anti diet space. And I just love everything that she shares about the language that we use around our families and our children about food, and more importantly, how we can start to change it so that maybe we can prevent the next generation from becoming quite so indoctrinated into dieting and diet culture. So tune into this episode with Jen, it has tons of really great practical things that you can tuck in your back pocket. At the end of the episode to us the next time you're sitting around the table and someone starts talking about diets. Okay, welcome Jenn to the midlife feast. How are you I'm

Jenn Messina  1:56  
doing good. I'm looking forward to chatting with you my big fan of the show. So I'm excited that I'm invited on.

Jenn Huber  2:03  
So to give listeners a bit of a backstory, Jen is again someone that I met on Instagram, which is pretty much everyone from the last three years. But we're both Canadian. And we're both gents that spell our names with two A's. So I feel we're kindred spirits. And then the third thing that connects us, which is the reason why I wanted to have you on the podcast is that we both are dieticians, who are very firmly planted in this kind of anti diet, non diet space and trying to create healthy relationships with food. So obviously, my audience and the people that I work with are in some stage of midlife and beyond, Jenna's a little younger, tend to work I think, correct me if I'm wrong, a little bit more with kind of families and people who are maybe in that kind of younger demographic. But if you follow Jen, and I'll have all of her links in the show notes, one of the things that I love that you do so well is bringing the conversations about body image, and talking about bodies, and anti diet and all of that stuff to the table. And it's a topic that comes up so much in the conversations that I have, because a lot of the people I work with, are either parents, or aunts or uncles or have children in their life and are starting to recognize that maybe the conversations that we were exposed to as kids growing up art serving us, and we want to change it for the next generation. It's a long story short, I wanted to have you on to talk about this. How do we get dye culture out of the house? for ourselves, for our kids for the next generation? How do we make it so that talking about people's bodies is not an acceptable topic at Christmastime? Mm hmm.

Jenn Messina  3:52  
Totally. I mean, I couldn't agree with you more. And I think like, that's really where my passion started was that, you know, I've been a dietitian for 15 years, but really, like, the more I learned about like the anti diet approach, and you know, intuitive eating, and how that works with kids, the more I realized how much of my own issues around food I may have started as early as four years old and how I felt about it wasn't always, you know, I mean, there's going to be many different reasons why we feel certain ways about our body, but some of that deep, you know, feeling of my body not being right, started at a very young age. So I knew that for me, I really wanted to change that narrative for my own kids so that they had the opportunity to be raised with a healthy relationship with food in their body, and maybe just maybe never diet in their whole life. So a lot of my clients I'm undoing, like decades of diet culture, but what if we started in the home and the home is really I think of it as like the bubble. It's the protective place that we can support our kids. To develop resilience against those messages, so what if we just started with not teaching them diet culture, instead of unlearning it when they're 40? Right? So that's really my passion is helping families, you know, navigate that. And if you have been doing things like a certain way, no guilt or shame, like we all do better when we know better, but it's like, how can we start today, whether your child is a baby, or they're 14? Or they're 25? You know, wherever you are in your journey, how can we change that conversation at home?

Jenn Huber  5:33  
Oh, my goodness. Yeah, I mean, prevention, right? It's prevention is the best men totally, how can we prevent that from happening? So as part of the intuitive eating, you know, framework, one of the things that we do with our clients is ask about, you know, what your family's food roles, what was that growing up? And it often surprises people when we dig into that, because a lot of times people will say to me, oh, no, no one died. And in my family, we didn't have it like, no, no, this didn't come from my family, my family was, you know, was fine. But then as we started talking about it, a lot of those rules were not overnight. It wasn't controlling portions, but it was only having sweets on Sunday night. You know, it was maybe mum and dad didn't die it but they talked about Auntie Sally and her weight changes. So a lot of it isn't the obvious stuff. But it's the stuff that's happening in the kind of background conversations. And when we have children around us, as we all know, they're always listening to their text. And they're absorbing it, and it's becoming part of their what I call default programming. So you mentioned that, like, you have this memory recollection of kind of it starting, what are some of the examples either from your own life or for the people that you work with that, you know, are examples of how that early childhood programming maybe, you know, shows up later in life.

Jenn Messina  7:05  
So I mean, I was in a larger body as a child. And, you know, I'm gonna preface this by saying that I am a sis white, hetero, straight size woman. So I do at this point, have a lot of privilege. So like, reflecting back on my childhood, being in a larger body, it still was, like, generally, like a socially acceptable body. But in my family, I was the biggest in my family. So I felt that I was different, because my body wasn't very thin, and very petite. So everyone in my family is like very small, genetically, very thin, and just smaller in stature. And then on my dad's side, we had like people that were taller and thin. So everybody was thin, basically. And here I am, I come in, and they called me each fall, like that was my nickname as a baby. And it was supposed to be endearing, right. And so I remember reflecting like, as a very young child, even as young as like four or five. And like, not that they called me beach ball at that time, but they would look at photos and be like, Oh, you were such a little beach ball and this and that. So I knew that there's something different about me from a very young age. And then I did see my mom who never imposed any food rules on me. But she impose them on herself. So you know, conversations, like, you know, Mommy, why are you drinking diet pop? Oh, Mommy doesn't want to drink her calories, right? Or, like, why aren't you having dessert? You know, I don't need that. Or you don't even remember, you know, like, let's have her salad first, so that we eat less at dinner, like there was always this discussion around how we can trick our bodies to eat less or feel more full with less things. So. So you know, I think those early memories really stayed with me that I had this core belief that food was something to fear, food was something that caused weight gain, like very, very easily. And that gaining weight was a bad thing. And that being in a larger body was a bad thing. So those were kind of my early beliefs. And then as you know, children grow and fits and spurts. I remember, you know, heading to the doctor's office, and I must have got gained weight. And I was, I came in and they were doing the pediatric check where they do the height and weight and for some reason, I was young, I was like seven or eight. And I remember, like, having felt feeling the need to like make excuses for why my weight had gone up. And saying like, Oh, maybe it was the Christmas cookies, I had a lot of Christmas cookies. But like even as a child like feeling the need to justify waking like you're a child like you, you gain weight because you're growing right? And we know that children don't grow equally in terms of weight and height at the same time. So lots of those kind of deep seated things that I I think weren't again or overtly trying to, like, make me feel guilt or shame around my body, but definitely sent the message that a certain type of body was a good body and other types of bodies were not good. And we needed to do everything in our power to avoid gaining weight or, you know, that sort of thing.

Jenn Huber  10:20  
Yeah, I definitely see that same kind of messaging as being so pervasive in you know, not just, you know, women who are in their 40s 50s and 60s and having grown up, but just, you know, even continually now, that, Oh, it's fine to not die it as long as you're not allergic. There's still another it's the privilege of like, oh, yeah, diets are bad, unless you have, you know, condition XYZ. So if we're talking about, so one question that comes up a lot is when we're talking about parents and things keynote, because when I talk to so many of the women in, you know, in my work, they often have teen teenage kids because of the age gap that we're at. And they'll say, you know, I don't want to comment on what they're eating. But I want them to eat healthy, how do I talk to them about that? And you've shared some really great information on your Instagram, it's such a wealth of information about like the language. So how would you answer that question to somebody who wants to have gentle nutrition conversations with their kids, but doesn't want to moralize those food choices as good or bad.

Jenn Messina  11:30  
And I love that you brought that up. So and like, I also want to just normalize that sometimes those words just pop out of our mouth. So like, even as a dietitian, and this is my expertise, like I remember my daughter had just went to birthday party, and she'd had cupcakes, and then she went to my parents house. And she had, I don't know, something else was sugar in it. And then as she was leaving, she said to me, let me kind of have a fruit roll up when we get home. And I just blurted out, you've had enough sugar for today, I think you've had an and then I was like, oh, like, you know, so I just want to normalize that sometimes, we say the wrong thing. So if you do say the wrong thing, if you say you don't, you're not just you can just eat junk all day, or, you know, like we've not been, we've been eating really badly over the holidays, or whatever it is, like you can go back and repair. And I'm going to be posting about this because I think a lot of us think, Oh darn, I've said that. And now I've ruined them for life. Kids are resilient too. And so it's not one thing that you say to them at one time that's going to like ruin their relationship with food in their body. But you can go back and I did go back and say, You know what, Mommy didn't mean to say that. And you can say whatever you want. But basically, we want to say that, I didn't actually mean to say what I was saying. So as children get older, you can say, like, I like to, like I said something in front of my 14 year old niece. And so I went back to repair. And I said, You know what, I didn't actually mean to say that, you know, I'm still like unlearning diet culture myself. And so sometimes the wrong thing comes out. And I didn't mean to say that, but I'm really learning and trying to do better. And so I think we can say that you can change the narrative or the language around littler kids. Like, you know, Molly didn't mean to say that, you know, we need all foods to help us feel good in our bodies, we just have a variety of foods. But you know, so go back and repair. If that comes up, and then moving forward, you can use a different language. So say you're noticing, for example, your your kid comes home, and they just like crushed a box of crackers. And then they're like, hangry, and you know, they need to be eating some proteins and veg, you know, like, we know basic nutrition.

Jenn Huber  13:30  
Is you hanging over my kitchen? Like how did you know that exact example? I feel

Jenn Messina  13:35  
like it's you want to hear all the time. So you know, how do we say to them? So I mean, we can relate it back to how they're feeling too. So you can say like, you know what I noticed yesterday when you just had you know, crackers for snack, you were quite hungry at your, you know, soccer class, like, do you think that maybe if you added a little bit of protein to that, that you might feel cool for longer, and then let them pause. Because at the older ages, we can do a bit of gentle nutrition, they are able to rationalize, generally under 12. I try not to talk too much specifics around nutrition and use more modeling behaviors. Even like younger kids, we could do things like choose something from the red basket and something from the green basket. So like help them plan snacks that way. But as they get older, you can say like, you know, maybe if you added a bit of cheese, or some peanut butter or some hummus and veggies, you might actually like have more energy for longer rather than that big energy crash that I noticed on the field. So that really kids really learn from their own experience. And also they learn from their own mistakes. So sometimes letting them make those mistakes and then, and then asking them if they'd be interested in like we can't force them to have if they're like, No, I only want to have crackers, then you can say okay, well I'm gonna have this myself but if you want it, it's in the fridge. So making certain foods more readily available is another kind of strategy that I like to use. So if you want your kids to eat more protein or veggies or fruits or whatever it is, then cut them up and put them on a plate or buy a premade packet. Have them or, you know, make it easier than because a lot of times it's also like E is right. So it's easy to grab a box of crackers, rather than chop up, you know a cantaloupe and pair it with sliced cheese, right? So make their lives easier if possible. And then you can have those simple conversations around like things that you've noticed. And then let them and don't expect will happen tomorrow. But like, let them see you doing that. And then kind of see where it goes from there. I think that'd be my best suggestion.

Jenn Huber  15:32  
I love love, love, love that. Yeah, I think that the the trying to get them to connect it to how they feel is such an important foundation for intuitive eating, that if we can really start that, even just like planting that seed early on, like, oh, how do you feel after that, it will start to make those connections. I love that funny story from when my oldest who's now almost 16 was three. And it was my, my younger two were like just a few months old. It was like her, you know, first Easter, and she had gone we had put her in front of the TV with, you know, her basket of Easter candy. Because we were trying to get, you know, twin babies ready to go for this brunch. It was all craziness. And we didn't realize that while she was watching this 20 minute show that she probably finished off about, oh, about 30 Chocolate addicts. And we didn't realize this and we you know, get in the car and we go to brunch. And about halfway through the brunch, she just looks at us and she's green. She's like, I don't feel well. And the whole way home while she's being sick. She's you know, swearing off chocolate for the rest of her life saying I'm never gonna use it again, I'm only having fruits and vegetables. And it's really funny, because it was actually this moment of like attunement for her. That it was like, oh, eating all of that at once really didn't feel good. You know. And, you know, there was no judgment on our part. And, you know, we laugh about it now. But I think it really was kind of that moment of, she made the connection. And you know, when we now when we're having conversations with teens and tweens about like, oh, you will feel it, you know, you'll have more energy to do your sport, you'll be able to pay attention in school. So again, trying to connect it to health. And not this is a good food, this is a bad food or using language like healthy, which is so ambiguous for an adult little teenager, like how do you even define that. So I love love that you suggested connecting those dots. And to make it easy, because as adults we love when things are prepared and presented to us too, right. So why would

Jenn Messina  17:35  
like that exactly. And I think your point too, about, like, if you have a child that you're noticing is like overly obsessed with a certain food, like say like it's chocolate or say it's like every time you buy a bag of chips, they just eat all of them. I think really using the same strategies of like, letting them eat to the point of satisfaction and maybe buying chips more often. And maybe buying chocolate more often. So when we make it not this only once a week, I buy a bag of chips, when we make it like this is your area in the cupboard. So the other thing I like to do with some older kids is like I have some kids that are like, they eat a lot of certain food only because they're worried that their siblings might get it. So it's like this is your area in the cupboard. And this is your food. And so you can use some of your own money like if you know, budget wise, like if you can afford certain things, having them in house more regularly great. But another thing you can do is be like let's go to the store and you choose something that you want and have it in your special area. And then you get to have that whenever you want. So that gives them a bit of ownership to it. And I also find that they're more careful when they buy it for themselves too. So you know, you have a certain budget, you buy three bags of chips a week. But if you're finding that they're still plowing through them, then maybe say like, Hey, let's go to the store and get, you know, a couple extra bags. So you can have them when you want them and and see if that helps take the excitement out of those certain foods. Similar we do this with adults. But with kids, they don't always have that unlimited permission because they don't have access to those foods like

Jenn Huber  19:06  
we do. Yeah, they don't have the autonomy. Yeah. Another great suggestion that I might actually adopt only because we totally have that sibling thing of like, I have to eat it now. Otherwise, somebody's gonna eat it. And they're usually right. Yeah, right. Yeah. So. So we can we have some control over what happens in our home. But we don't necessarily have control over what happens in other people's homes and often related to families. And we've just, we're recording this in January. So we've just come through the holidays. And one of the conversations that I have often is, oh, I cringed at you know, Uncle so and so or auntie so and so when they were talking about the next diet that they were starting in January or those kinds of things. Do you have any advice for parents who maybe can't separate or can't cut out the people in their lives who are still very entrenched in diet culture, but they're trying to create is a bit of a buffer or safe environment for the kids? What do you recommend in terms of that? Those responses that language, what can people kind of tuck in their back pocket for that next family?

Jenn Messina  20:11  
So I think there's two things here. One is if the comments are directed at the, like, if the adults are talking about their diets themselves, versus if they're talking about your child, and how much they're eating, or weighing and those types of things. So those are two kind of separate things, we'll talk first one is the comments about, you know, like, Oh, I'm gonna do keto in January, like I've gained some weight and, and it's, you know, previous, you know, Gen 10 years ago, I'd be like, Oh, whatever, like, that's not a big deal. But now I'm like, You know what, that's actually harmful. Now, my child thinks that they need to dye it and this sort of thing. So there's a couple things, one of them you can do is talk to those family members privately in advance and say, you know, what, like, we all know who's like diet, Debbie in our house. And we can say, like, hey, you know, I'm really trying to support. So in my, you know, my child have a healthy relationship with food in their body. So one of the ways that we're doing that is we're actually not talking about dieting, weight weight loss at all, because we're trying to help support them to really listen to their body and their body cues. So you can have that conversation in advance. And most people are pretty receptive to that, I would say, like, unless somebody, but not to say they're not going to make mistakes, which they are. So you know, I have a family that still like pretty entrenched in dying culture. So sometimes, so despite having that conversation, something might come up, like, oh, that has too many calories for me. And I'll say, remember, no, not like, calories are a good thing. Like I'll, like, I'll kind of like make these like, little like reminders, like a broken record. But the more we gently remind like, the more that because we also have to be compassionate that like, many people are still living in that culture. So you know, just kind of like shredding them. And like telling them the research about how this is like harmful, you know, is not going to be going over so well. So I've been gentle reminders, having that discussion in advance would be the way that I would tackle the diet talk around the home. The other piece I wanted to highlight was any conversations around a child's weight or shape or what they're eating, because we know, especially in the preteen years, weight gain can happen quite rapidly. And even in the early teen years. And for girls, we tend to see, you know, central fat accumulation on the abdomen, before they develop breasts. So a lot of times parents are worried, like, Oh, my God, my daughter is like getting a big belly now, right? And they're concerned about this. So sometimes well, meaning family members might have a comment about that. So you know, as the parents, we know that this is normal. And this is how the body prepares for puberty prepares, you know, female bodies for developing breasts and redistribution of that fat among their body. So we know that this is normal, but other people might not know that this is normal, including my own parents when I was growing up. So right, so how do we buffer them when they say something like, Oh, you've got a big appetite. So we need to let our kids know that we think that their bodies are fine, just the way that they are. So in those moments, like, I'm pretty clear about making comments, like, you know, what her she knows exactly how much your body needs to grow and thrive. Like, we actually don't comment on anyone's weight or shape because it's not really helpful. And then I would have a private conversation about that. You know, and if a child is asking for seconds, and they're getting like a, you know, a raise die, I think, you know, again, reiterating that, like, you know, he or she knows exactly how much they need. So we don't need to micromanage what they're eating, I trust them, I trust their body to know how much they need. And really using the intuitive eating language, I think we can start doing ourselves like, you know, does your body feel full? Oh, it doesn't Oh, okay. So you know, have some more then right. So, you know, and then we can use that ourselves, like, hey, you know, do you want a second slice of cake? And I can say, you know, actually, my body is feeling quite full right now, I don't need any more right now. And maybe I'll have some tomorrow, you know, so we can start using that language in front of them, and around our loved ones to set the message that like, the only person that knows how much that child needs to eat is them. And I often say to my own kids, like, like, they get different messages. Like if they're at like dinner at someone else's house, right? They might be told, like you have to eat your dinner before dessert. And so I'll say, you know, all families have different rules. So if you're even if it's a grandma's house, That's grandma's rule. Like that's grandma's rule, and that's okay. But at our house, like we believe and I like to use that phrase in our house, we believe that all foods are the same. So it doesn't matter if you get dessert first or last, like you know what you need in order to get the food, the, you know, nutrition that you need. So, you know, I find having kids hear that from us that we're standing up for them is really supportive in them knowing that we trust them to know that that their body is right.

Jenn Huber  24:57  
Yes, I love everything you said. I think especially, you know, just being able to give kids the language, you know, from an early age is empowering. But it's also really setting, I think the stage for a much healthier relationship with food. You know, going back to the point about what happens at puberty when I'm working with women and trying to understand their relationship with food, you know, statistically, most of them, which was also me, went on our first dine at 12, which is right around puberty. And it shocks people to hear that our body fat percentage has to double in order to achieve and maintain menstruation. You know? And how would that have changed the lives of like, probably millions and millions of women, if we had known that, that's what our body needs to do, right? And, but we, you know, we're talking about it more now. But even now, it's still new information for a lot of people. But in hindsight, it makes someone seen it in ourselves, we can see it in our children. But it's just so important to normalize, what what needs to happen biologically, right, and that, if we start to try and fight against that, the body's going back. And that's the cycle we're trying to get people out of, which is that diet cycle of on again, off,

Jenn Messina  26:22  
and really, our body is on our side, like, your body is always trying to help you. So I always try to reiterate, like, if you're hungry, or today, like even to my kids, or, you know, I even say to myself, like sometimes I'm like, wow, why am I hungry for lunches tonight, I am like, I'm like, kind of annoyed, because I'm trying to do what I'm wanting to do, right? But then I'm like, you don't want my body knows exactly what it needs. Like, if it's hungry, or it needs more nutrition today, if I ate more last night, I might not be as hungry. So I think like, just trying to reiterate to your to yourself and also your kids like, just like, you're the only one that knows when you need to pee, you're the only one that knows what you need to eat, and how much you need to eat, you know, that sort of thing. So you know, it is hard navigating this, these tricky situations around family, and we're not going to get it perfect. And sometimes we do need to have that conversation with our child at home. Like, Hey, Grandma said this, you know, like, how did that make you feel? Like what are your thoughts about that? And then sometimes just kind of debriefing about it and having that conversation and not being scared to say you know, that is a little bit old beliefs you know, that might not be really serving us right now. And what we know now is x y&z So I think it's okay to have those conversations with our kids and go back to repair. I know parents sometimes, like with repair, like sometimes they don't want to, like admit that they said the wrong thing or admit that other people, but I think children really, especially in the preteen and teen, they love hearing that they love hearing us say that we've made mistakes, because they make mistakes all the time. So it's like normalizing that, like, you know, sometimes we do or say the wrong thing. And that's okay. And we can change how we think and do things differently next time.

Jenn Huber  28:02  
Yes, thank you so much. I feel like everything that you said in this, you know, these 30 minutes are so applicable and relatable. I love the repair piece. Because, again, it's such an example of like all or nothing thinking, right? Like, we don't have to be perfect at what we're trying, we're trying to do better. We don't have to be perfect. And when we will make mistakes, we will need to come back and you know, and repair it. So I really, really love that and love all the suggestions for language. So thank you so much. So even though you're not in midlife, I always ask my guests, what do you think the missing ingredient in midlife is? So I'd love to hear what you have to say.

Jenn Messina  28:42  
And I think like as I'm entering into this new phase myself likely within the next few years, I really think it's knowledge to be honest, like I think knowledge about our bodies knowledge about what to expect what is quote unquote normal. I feel like there's so much misinformation out there. And it's there's so much like demonizing of midlife as something to fear and this and that, like, you know, but I think the more that you learn about it, the less scary it is. So even if you're not in midlife learning about it in advance so that you know what to expect. And what like I love one of the things you said like in one of your podcasts, you talked about how like women come to you and think like they feel like they're like going crazy, like because they're like having a bunch of like weird, like their periods a little bit weird. Sometimes as long sometimes it's short. Sometimes they have mood swings, sometimes they don't like and all these things and like they think they're going crazy. They're like, you know what's happening and they have no idea that this is actually normal and expected and and you know what to expect, I think is the best power we can have and help support each other to know that like our body again, is doing just what it needs to do at exactly the right rate for you. And then it's not something interfere. So that would be my. So thank you for your podcast, honestly, like I've learned so much about midlife in advance for myself, and then I help. I also help my clients like, find your page and find and learn more. Because I think, again, they don't know that maybe some of the symptoms are experiencing are this perimenopause phase, which, like you'd said, can last like a decade, right. So it can be a long, sometimes it's short, and sometimes it's not. But I think having use of resources really supportive of women of all ages.

Jenn Huber  30:31  
Thank you. So I'm sure that there are going to be people who want to learn more about you and the work that you do. So tell us a little bit about where they can find you and how you work with

Jenn Messina  30:41  
Yeah, so I'm on Instagram at Jen, the dietitian. So you can join me there. You know, there's lots of information, stuff to say that sort of thing. I work with clients in BC One to One. And I have a private practice that I work with clients if you're outside the province of BC. Unfortunately, I can't see you one to one I am in the process of creating a program which will be open worldwide, but at this time, it's not open just yet. So come find me and be the first to know when that does open up.

Jenn Huber  31:13  
Awesome, and I will have all those links in the show notes. But yes, Jen, the dietitian Yeah, with two ends. In lots and lots of great info. I learned stuff every time that you so I thank you for.

Jenn Messina  31:26  
Thank you. So thanks.

Jenn Huber  31:29  
And thanks everyone for listening. Have a great day. Hey there. Thanks so much for tuning in to this week's episode of the midlife feast. Just remember that the midlife feast community membership is now open for registration and it is the perfect place for you to gather, grow and nourish with other people in midlife who know exactly what you're going through. You can find a link to join this monthly membership in the show notes. We'd love to have you join us as you feast on midlife. And if you found this podcast episode helpful or any of the episodes on the midlife feast, just a reminder that the best way to help others find us is to rate and review the podcast wherever you tuned in.